Power2X

DeepWind is now committed to forming specialist subgroups to offer member companies greater focus than can be achieved through general membership of the cluster. The aim is to provide added value to our members by concentrating on those areas of offshore wind which better match the skills and expertise possessed by subsets of our membership.  

  

Power2X Subgroup

In order to encourage innovation, members will come together under specialist subgroups in DeepWind to look at the opportunity for collaboration within the cluster. This page is dedicated to our Power2X Subgroup which is involved in looking at alternate products from offshore wind besides the normal electricity to the grid business model.
The X can stand for any product such as green hydrogen and green ammonia or energy storage in general. It also covers the manufacture of green 'drop in' fuels such as methanol and jet fuel.  

The aim of the subgroup is to bring together our members expertise in offshore wind and marry that to the experience of our members from the oil and gas sector who already have knowledge of offshore gas production and gas transport. The subgroup does not want to stop there as we also want to include a further cross sector approach by adding members from the green hydrogen, green fuels and energy storage sectors to bring the necessary supply chain products and skills to enable the large scale production of such 'X' products from offshore wind.

Power2X Potential in Scotland
In early September the Offshore Wind Energy Council published a report looking at the potential for large scale green hydrogen production from offshore wind. The full report is available by clicking on this link - Offshore Wind and Hydrogen: -Solving the Integration Challenge.

This report highlights the huge wind resource available in UK waters as part of its key findings ‘The UK has outstanding OSW resource, with the potential for over 600GW in UK waters, and potentially up to 1000GW, well above the figure of 75-100GW likely to be needed for UK electricity generation by 2050’.

The bulk of this resource lies in Scottish waters and will require floating wind technology to tap a significant proportion of this resource.

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Modelled LCOE in UK waters - Image credit: ORE Catapult

The above map shows that the two lowest bands, £50/MWh and £60/MWh, correspond to a capacity of approximately 675GW. Should the next Contract for Difference round in the UK, due around May-July 2021, push prices lower still then the map will need to be updated again.

The opportunity for an offshore wind/hydrogen supply chain will be huge. Based on a predicted hydrogen demand of 130TWh to 200TWh in 2050, this would require between 40GW-60GW of offshore wind dedicated to just hydrogen production. There is also the opportunity to add further capacity to serve a wider Northern European market and create a green hydrogen export market in Scotland. This would result in a UK offshore wind market of up to 150GW by 2050.

Green Hydrogen Hubs  
Early stage hydrogen hub projects such as ORION in Shetland, HOP in Orkney and the Cromarty Hydrogen Hub are looking at offshore wind as the basis for large scale green hydrogen production.
DeepWind member ERM recently announced their floating wind to hydrogen Dolphyn project will be based off Aberdeen with the aim of supplying the city’s own Hydrogen Hub project and with the goal of having a 4GW project in place by 2034. ERM's FEED study decided that offshore production of hydrogen with a pipeline to shore was the most economic option compared to a subsea cable and onshore electrolysis. The Phase 1 Final Report for BEIS can be downloaded by clicking this link 

Hydrogen is also being looked at as part of the Energy Transition process required to deliver the UK Oil and Gas industry's target of a Net Zero Basin by 2035. A wind/hydrogen approach can deliver the necessary 24/7 offshore energy supply required by the sector to power their offshore production infrastructure.
Subgroup member TechnipFMC's Deep Purple project looks at large scale offshore hydrogen storage on the sea floor with the hydrogen being produced from offshore wind to provide stable power to such offshore infrastructure. The image below shows floating wind powering a floating electrolysis station with seabed hydrogen storage (shown in purple, of course) which in turn is powering nearby Oil and Gas platforms and subsea infrastructure.

TechnipFMC Deep Purple project 
Image credit: TechnipFMC

Subgroup Industry Co-Chairs 
The subgroup Co-chairs are provided by Aker Solutions and Bilfinger Salamis who already have experience in Power to Gas and other technologies from the Power2X stable. This newly launched subgroup currently has over 40 members but we are keen to grow this membership by adding companies from the oil and gas sector as well as more companies from the hydrogen production and energy storage supply chains.

Companies interested in joining this subgroup should complete our DeepWind membership form on our main cluster page here (click this link to open in new tab)

List of Power2X Subgroup members

1 4C Engineering
2 Abbey Ecosse
3 Aberdeen City Council
4 Aker Solutions
5 Apollo
6 AqualisBraemar
7 Bilfinger Salamis UK
8 Caithness Engineering Services Ltd
9 Cetix Ltd
10 Crondall Energy
11 Distibution NOW
12 Dolfines SAS
13 EC-OG
14 Enerpro
15 Environmental Resources Management Limited
16 ESB
17 ExpExp
18 Floating Power Plant
19 Freudenberg Oil & Gas Technologies
20 Hartmann Valves and Wellheads
21 Hydrasun Ltd
22 Intertek Inspection Services UK Limited
23 Liberty Steel Dalzell
24 Linxon UK Ltd
25 Logan Energy
26 Mainstream Renewables
27 Miros Scotland
28 National Oilwell Varco
29 Nevis Environmental
30 Optimus
31 Petrofac Facilities Management Ltd
32 Port of Cromarty Firth
33 Principle Power
34 Quaybridge
35 RIDG
36 Royal Haskoning DHV
37 RSK Environmental
38 Scottish Power Renewables
39 Searchwise Aberdeen
40 Semco Maritime
41 sHYp BV Ltd
42 Siemens Subsea
43 Talon Board Advisory
44 TechnipFMC
45 Thornton Tomasetti
46 Trac Oil & Gas Ltd
47 WPD Offshore Solutions GmbH